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USAARL News


FORT RUCKER, Ala. (October 23, 2014)—Col. Mark Adams, front, british exchange flight surgeon, Survival Analysis Division, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, briefs Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Farnsworth, director of Army Safety and commanding general, U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center during a tour of USAARL.

During his visit, Farnsworth flew in USAARL’s UH-60 flight simulator and experienced first-hand the capabilities of the Tactile Situation Awareness System, a one-of-a-kind system developed to enhance a pilot’s situation awareness to prevent spatial disorientation while flying. Farnsworth also toured the laboratory’s sensory research and injury prevention research divisions.

USAARL collaborates with the USACR/SC by briefing and conducting tours for the Aviation Safety Officer Course and Ground Safety Officer Course. USAARL also supports Class A, B, and C mishap investigations by providing to USACR/SC analysis reports on safety and protective equipment.

USAARL develops, tests, and evaluates performance solutions within the military operational environment to preserve the health, safety, and performance of the air and ground Warrior.

Photo by Scott Childress

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FORT RUCKER, Ala. (October 22, 2014)—John Ramiccio, left, chief, Flight Systems Branch, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, briefs Brigadier James Illingworth OBE, Military Attaché and Head of British Army Staff-United States, during a demonstration of the Tactile Situation Awareness System.

During his visit to USAARL, Illingworth flew in a NUH-60FS simulator and experienced first-hand the capabilities of the TSAS, a one-of-a-kind system developed to enhance a pilot’s situational awareness and to prevent spatial disorientation while flying. Illingworth was also briefed on the laboratory’s research programs.

USAARL develops, tests, and evaluates performance solutions within the military operational environment to preserve the health, safety, and performance of the air and ground Warrior.

Photo by Catherine Davis

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^ Photo Caption: The dual-mode Noise Immune Stethoscope. ^
U.S. Army photo by Scott Childress

Noise Immune Stethoscope (NIS) approved for production
Catherine Davis, Public Affairs Specialist

FORT RUCKER, Ala. (Jan. 21, 2014) – In collaboration with Active Signal Technologies, a Small Business Innovation Research partner, the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Fort Rucker, Ala. and U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Md. developed a medical device that can be used to listen to heart and lung sounds in high-noise environments such as medical evacuation vehicles.

“Heart and lung sounds are a necessary component of casualty triage and ongoing care. Hearing and assessing these sounds with traditional acoustic stethoscopes is very difficult on the battlefield. It is vitally important that military medical care providers have the necessary tools while managing patients.” said Maj. Tim Cho, USAARL Aeromedical Factors branch chief.

The Noise Immune Stethoscope, like a standard acoustic stethoscope, uses an acoustic listening mode, and also adds ultrasound-based technology that is “noise immune” to amplify heart and lung sounds. This technology has the capability for users to easily switch from Doppler to acoustic mode. Both modes immediately turn body sounds into electrical signals for enhanced performance. The Communications Earplug, currently being used by aviators, attaches to the NIS and allows auscultation while wearing the flight helmet.

“The dual-mode stethoscope is specifically designed for high noise conditions,” said Cho. “As a result, the flight surgeon or flight medic will be able to make more accurate decisions while en route to higher echelons of care during flight.”

The NIS enables medical personnel to assess abnormalities of the cardiopulmonary system in high-noise environments like the transportation of wounded Soldiers in medical evacuation aircraft, ground warfare, and intensive care units.

Between 2007 and 2013, the NIS received U.S. Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance, and through a series of rigorous laboratory and field tests conducted by USAARL, the NIS received an airworthiness release for use on-board the Black Hawk helicopter. The device is now approved for full-rate production to be used in real-world operational environments.

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^ Photo Caption: John Ramiccio, right, chief, Flight Systems Branch, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, briefs Capt. Jeffrey Andrews, commanding officer of Naval Medical Research Unit-Dayton during a demonstration of the Tactile Situation Awareness System at Fort Rucker, Ala. Sep. 18. During the visit to USAARL, Andrews and Dr. Richard Arnold, NAMRU-D technology director, met with USAARL researchers to discuss future collaboration efforts. Andrews and Arnold also presented to laboratory personnel a seminar on NAMRU-D history, mission, and primary goals. ^
Photo by Catherine Davis, USAARL

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^ Photo Caption:Col. Mark Packer, director of the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence, and Tanisha Hammill, senior research administrator, visited the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory at Fort Rucker, Ala. Sep. 11. Packer and Hammill met with the command team and principal investigators involved in auditory and vestibular research to discuss USAARL’s collaboration with HCoE. These discussions focused on building upon a high caliber network of physicians, scientists, and researchers devoted to solving and/or preventing hearing loss and auditory related injuries within the DoD. Packer also presented to laboratory personnel a seminar on HCoE’s history, mission, and primary goals. ^
Photo by Steve Martin, USAARL

Last updated: 11/25/2014