News Articles & Media

USAARL publishes medical toolkit
Posted December 13th, 2017 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

One of the most challenging decisions facing military health care providers is if and when a previously wounded warfighter is fit to return-to-duty.

The U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory recently published a return-to-duty medical guide for health care providers titled, “Return-to-Duty Toolkit: Assessments and Tasks for Determining Military Functional Performance Following Neurosensory Injury.”

The purpose of this Toolkit is to be a reference guide and resource containing currently available assessments for use by healthcare providers who must make RTD decisions. Depending on the symptoms experienced by the patient, the Toolkit intends to provide a tailorable selection of assessments from which to measure progress toward and make final RTD determinations.

While many of the assessments are well known and well validated, others contained in the Toolkit are at various states of trial and validation.

The guide can be used to customize performance assessments to specific military occupational requirements and/or to the warfighter’s specific potential impairment–within the clinician’s scope of practice.

The Toolkit contains the efforts of many dedicated experts including medical researchers, occupational and physical therapists, and healthcare providers who shared the goal of providing evidence-based tools for military RTD assessments.

The Toolkit is available for download at http://www.usaarl.army.mil/TechReports/2017-19.pdf

 


 

2017 GEMS Near-Peer Mentor (NPM) selected as President of National Honor Society at Enterprise High School - Photo

The U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory hosted 8th grade students from Enterprise, Ozark, and Daleville City Schools systems during the Aviation Aerospace Pipeline Initiative tour Dec. 12

USAARL hosts avaiation aerospace pipeline students
Posted December 12th, 2017 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

The U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory hosted 100, 8th grade students during the Aviation Aerospace Pipeline Initiative tour Dec. 12.

The students, from Enterprise, Ozark, and Daleville City Schools systems, are part of the Aviation Aerospace Pipeline Initiative, which aims to prepare, train, and retain the state’s future aviation and aerospace workforce by educating local middle and high school students about career pathways for jobs in the aviation and aerospace industry.

By educating students about jobs in the aviation and aerospace fields, the students will be better informed when selecting the high school courses necessary to establish a strong educational foundation and pathway for their future career success.

Fort Rucker's support of this initiative included tours of the School of Army Aviation Medicine, Aviation Center Logistics Command, and Directorate of Simulation.

 


 

2017 GEMS Near-Peer Mentor (NPM) selected as President of National Honor Society at Enterprise High School - Photo

2017 GEMS Near-Peer Mentor (NPM) selected as President of National Honor Society at Enterprise High School
Posted October 18th, 2017 Story & Photo by: Amy Baker, STEM Education Administrator

Julie Strickland, a near-peer mentor during the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory’s 2017 Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science program, will be inducted as President of the National Honor Society at Enterprise High School Oct. 24.

During Strickland’s Forensics module near-peer mentorship, she led 24, 6th-7th graders through hands-on activities including fingerprinting, DNA testing, and bloodstain pattern analysis.

“During GEMS, Strickland demonstrated strong teaching skills, and brought to GEMS a positive personality that made her a great role model to the GEMS students,” said Dr. Amy Baker, USAARL’s Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics education administrator.

GEMS is an extracurricular, STEM education program that enables students in grades 4-11 from the Wiregrass region of southeast Alabama to engage in hands-on experiments and to focus on STEM career fields. GEMS near-peer mentors lead the GEMS modules and serve as role models to the students by promoting science and math concepts and by acting as expert resources concerning college life and career pathways.

As National Honor Society president, Strickland will mainly be responsible for presiding over chapter meetings and activities as well as serving as an example for current members and future members. She will also collaborate with fellow officers and senior National Honor Society members for service project ideas during the 2017-2018 school year as a way to give back to the community.

The National Honor Society is the nation’s premier organization established to recognize high school students who excel in scholarship, service, leadership, and character. Since its inception in 1921, the organization has flourished with chapters in all 50 states and an estimated 1 million students having participated in National Honor Society activities. The organization highlights the students’ scholastic achievements while encouraging them to develop further in their leadership skills through school involvement and community service.

 “Strickland’s selection as the EHS National Honor Society President is just another way that she is demonstrating her potential to emerge as a great professional and leader,” said Baker.

 


 

USAARL presents at scientific meeting - Photo

William (Bill) Kidd, deputy to the USAACE commanding general, and Col. Geoff Crawford, director of the USAACE G-3 proponency office, tour the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory on June 27. U.S. Army Photo by Catherine Davis

Kidd tours the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory
Posted July 19th, 2017 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

William (Bill) Kidd, deputy to the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence commanding general, and Col. Geoff Crawford, director of the USAACE G-3 proponency office, toured the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory June 27.

The tour began with an overview of the Laboratory followed by more in-depth briefings about USAARL’s research and capabilities from subject matter experts in the fields of biomechanics, vision, acoustics, and aircrew health and performance. During the tour, Kidd and Crawford also stopped in to observe and learn more about the Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science program.

Kidd assumed responsibility in May, and has since, been familiarizing himself with the many different organizations at Fort Rucker.

 


USAARL officer meets Prince Charles
Posted July 18th, 2017 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

A U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory exchange officer, Lt. Col. Dan Porter, Military Personnel Exchange Program participant stationed at the Army Air Corps Medical Centre, Middle Wallop, United Kingdom met Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, June 6.

Porter, along with serving soldiers, veterans, and their families, celebrated the 60th anniversary of the Army Air Corps at Salisbury Cathedral.

“I was shocked when Prince Charles walked over to speak to me and shake my hand,” said Porter.

Porter further explains that Prince Charles asked what Porter was doing in the United Kingdom. Porter explained that he was an exchange officer serving at Middle Wallop. The Prince of Wales then asked if Porter was enjoying his time in the United Kingdom. Porter responded with “My family and I are having a marvelous time in the UK, and it is an honor to be serving alongside our British Army allies.” Prince Charles wished Porter well before exiting the cathedral.

The MPEP, a Department of the Army program, was implemented through a memorandum of agreement between the United Kingdom and the United States in 1962 by the Foreign Science and Technology Center, a predecessor to the National Ground Intelligence Center. The program provides unique opportunities for British and American officers to strengthen alliances and build coalition partnerships.

 


 

USAARL presents at scientific meeting - Photo

Brigid Byrd, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education participant, presented a poster titled “The Effects of Hypoxia on the Direct and Consensual Pupillary Light Reflex” during the 88th Annual Aerospace Medical Association scientific meeting in Denver, CO Apr. 29-May 4.

USAARL presents at scientific meeting
Posted May 31st, 2017 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

The U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory participated in the 88th Annual Aerospace Medical Association scientific meeting in Denver, CO Apr. 29-May 4.

USAARL researchers dominated the stage with thirteen presentations and two posters describing the Laboratory’s current research efforts in aerospace medicine.

“The annual AsMA meeting is the largest forum in the world for research in USAARL’s niche area of aerospace medicine, and the Laboratory made a very strong showing this year,” said Dr. John Crowley, USAARL science program director.

Similar to AsMA’s presentation goal, USAARL’s presentations aimed to enhance knowledge and understanding of the current challenges in aerospace medicine and provide recommendations for improving the health, safety, and performance of those involved in aviation and extreme environments.

While most of Laboratory’s AsMA attendees are senior scientists, USAARL leaders encourage young researchers to attend and experience this annual scientific meeting by presenting their research to conference attendees. Brigid Byrd, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education participant, was among those young researchers who attended and presented at AsMA.

“My first conference experience at AsMA was very rewarding,” said Byrd. “I enjoyed the opportunity to interact with researchers from other professions and learn how their work is influencing the aerospace medical community.”

USAARL is a small research laboratory with a broad mission. Networking with colleagues with similar interests is essential in order to coordinate, collaborate, and make the most of limited funding.

“USAARL researchers and support staff work hard to support our mission,” said Crowley. “It’s great to see the impact of USAARL’s science program on the international aerospace community.”

 


 

USAARL simulates aircraft rapid decompression - Photo
Col. Richard Malish, USAARL commander, receives a demonstration of USAARL's new rapid decompression chamber. The chamber, designed by USAARL fabricators, simulates a rapid decrease in aircraft cabin pressure as the altitude increases from 8,000 to 45,000 feet.

USAARL simulates aircraft rapid decompression
Posted May 31st, 2017 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

The U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory’s Airworthiness Certification and Evaluation Division is the U.S. Army’s center of excellence for providing a joint test, evaluation, and certification program focused on carry-on medical equipment used by military health care providers during aeromedical evacuation transport of wounded Warfighters and Soldiers from the battlefield to more definitive healthcare.

As part of expanding USAARL’s airworthiness testing capability, the ACE Division can now test an in-flight emergency by simulating, in a static chamber, an abrupt change in cabin pressurization, or rapid decompression, from 8,000 to 45,000 feet. Rapid decompression is often caused by a sudden rupture in the aircraft fuselage, loss of a window, or cargo door separation.

“The decompression chamber was designed and developed by USAARL’s skilled engineers and machinists,” said David Jones, ACE Division chief. “This in-house effort will reduce test time and costs of future carry-on medical airworthiness certification programs.”

The new chamber is among several other in-house testing platforms including an altitude chamber, a blowing rain chamber (also developed by USAARL engineers and machinist), and climatic chambers.

Medical carry-on devices must pass rigorous airworthiness testing in accordance with the Joint En route Care Equipment Test Standard-Revision 1 to ensure that the equipment continues to perform to the manufacturer’s specifications while exposed to the harsh enroute care environments, promoting the safe interaction among the medical equipment, patients, aircrew, and the aircraft.

Since 2012, JECETS has become widely accepted and recognized as the joint service standard for testing medical carry-on items for use aboard U.S. Army rotary-wing helicopters and U.S. Air Force fixed-wing aircraft.

 


 

USAARL Hosts Military Standards Class - Photo

Col. Richard Malish, USAARL commander; Dr. George Ludwig, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command principal assistant for research and technology; and Master Sgt. Natasha Turrell, USAARL senior medical laboratory non-commissioned officer, cut the ribbon to the new USAARL exhibit Dec. 6.

USAARL unveils military aeromedical exhibit
Posted Dec 6th, 2016 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

The U.S Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory unveiled its new Army aeromedical research exhibit Dec. 6. The exhibit focuses on USAARL’s research divisions and their missions, capabilities, competencies, and future directions.

The exhibit features USAARL’s contributions to aeromedical research beginning in the 1960s, when the Laboratory opened its doors, to the present day. Many of these contributions significantly impacted the lives of Service Members worldwide.

“It is my hope that when walking through this display, visitors to USAARL will learn about the meaningful contributions the Laboratory has made to the U.S. Army, and that the visitors get a sense of the impact USAARL will have on the Soldiers and aircrews in the future,” said Col. Richard Malish, USAARL commander. “The exhibit will both inform visitors about our current research efforts and inspire the next generation of medical advancement and life-saving innovation.”

USAARL’s scientists and engineers place at the forefront of their research mission the safety, health, and well-being of Service Members. By doing so, Lab personnel conduct relevant research that minimizes health hazards to Service Members and ultimately improves the effectiveness of operational military medicine.

 


 

USAARL Hosts Military Standards Class - Photo

USAARL Hosts Military Standards Class
Posted Nov 7th, 2016 Story & Photo by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

The U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory’s Airworthiness Certification and Evaluation Division hosted a military standard “MIL-STD-810G: Test Method Standard for Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests” training class October 24-26.

Attendees included personnel from USAARL, the Aviation Engineering Directorate, and the Air Force Test Laboratory. The class provided in-depth training focused on using MIL-STD-810G environmental test procedures to further enhance the Joint Enroute Care Equipment Test Standard for airworthiness certification testing on medical items.

 


USAARL Awards Safety Essay Contest Winners
Posted September 28th, 2016 Story by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

Students from across the Wiregrass were invited to participate in the 2016 safety essay contest hosted by the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Fort Rucker, Ala.

The contest was open to any student age 8 to 18 years. Students age 8 to 12 years old wrote a one-page essay about “Safety at Home or at School,” and students age 13 to 18 years old wrote a two-page essay about “The Science of Safety.”

Judges from the Fort Rucker Elementary School and U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center chose a winner and runner-up from each category. Essays were scored on creativity, authenticity, grammar, and overall impression. The winner and runner-up in each category received a certificate and a gift card to Steve Spangler Science©.

The winners and runners-up were:
Corey Vaughn: winner, Safety at Home or at School
Hunter Savell: runner-up, Safety at Home or at School
Maya Harlow: winner, The Science of Safety
Isaiah Henderson: runner-up, The Science of Safety

In her essay, Harlow notes that “Safety is a science in and of itself. The roads are mapped out, the places stop signs are posted, and the speed limits enforced on the roadways are all carefully engineered so that we can quickly get from one place to another in the safest way possible.”

The contest aimed to increase safety awareness and prevention in parents and participants.

Vaughn’s safety at school essay instructs readers to stay safe in the science lab by listening to the teacher. He writes, “The teacher will tell you what to do and how to do it safely. If you aren’t paying attention to what the teacher is saying you can end up hurting someone or yourself by using the wrong chemical or doing the experiment the wrong way.”

“Safety is very important…and if you’re not being safe about things, you never know what’s going to happen,” said Savell. “You have to make the right decisions.”

Henderson simply wrote, “Be aware of the risks and hazards involved in any experiment. Be smart and be responsible when doing an experiment.”

“Safety promotion is one of the five core functions of the Army safety program, and awareness activities like these help keep safety and accident prevention in the forethought of target demographics and hopefully contribute to accident prevention,” said Tom Franz, USAARL safety officer. “We hope that this contest is the first of many.”

USAARL has received many safety awards such as the Director of Army Safety Risk Management Award, the Army Safety Excellence Streamer, and three Department of Army Accident Prevention Awards of Accomplishment in Safety.

Through research and development, USAARL supports military operations and modernization of solutions to enhance the medical readiness and performance challenges of Army aviators and ground forces.



 

USAARL Provides Education Outreach to Fort Rucker Children

USAARL Provides Education Outreach to Fort Rucker Children
Posted September 20th, 2016 Story by: Catherine Davis, USAARL Public Affairs Officer

Personnel from the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory science, technology, engineering, and mathematics office taught hands-on science experiments to children at the Fort Rucker Child Development Center during summer 2016.

Dr. Lori St. Onge, STEM education coordinator, and Jessica Cumbee, STEM research education assistant coordinator, taught approximately 80 four- to six-year-olds about hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials, chemical reactions, and magnets.

The children experienced some of the same practices as real scientists, donning safety glasses and gloves before making hydrofoil boats, mixing table salt and white vinegar to cause a chemical reaction, and testing different objects to see if they were magnetic.

"Many students perceive STEM concepts as intimidating. Through early familiarization and engagement, we hope to create an excitement for and nurture students’ interest in STEM. By introducing STEM concepts through exploration and demonstration in unique, fun environments, students are not as intimidated and are more likely to ask questions and problem solve," said Cumbee.

USAARL’s involvement in STEM education outreach is a result of U.S. Executive Order 12821 – Improving Mathematics and Science Education in Support of the National Education Goals. The STEM programs offered at USAARL, the Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science program and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education program, support the advancement of STEM-related initiatives and disciplines to achieve National Education Goals.

In addition, USAARL is authorized by the Education Partnership Act, Title 10 U.S. Code 2194, to transfer excess defense laboratory equipment to educational nonprofit organizations. Transfer of excess equipment is intended to facilitate and nurture the study of science, art, and mathematics by students. USAARL has participated in eight equipment transfers in the past five years.

Photo by Catherine Davis, U.S. Army
Caption: Jessica Cumbee, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research education assistant coordinator, teaches a group of Fort Rucker Child Development Center students how safely mixing table salt and white vinegar causes a chemical reaction, creating a solution to clean and brighten pennies.


Background Image
About
Leadership
Our History
Research Platforms
Visitor Tour Information
Be a Volunteer!
Partnerships
STEM

Research
Airworthiness Certification and Evaluation
Aircrew Health and Performance
Auditory Protection and Performance
Visual Protection and Performance
Flight Systems
Injury Biomechanics
Survival Analysis Team
Science Information Center Library

Media & Publications
Current News
Brochures
Media Contacts
Social Media Hub
Technical Reports
Journal Articles
HMD Books
Information
Information Collected
Contact Us
Accessibility/Section 508
Privacy & Security Notice
External Links Disclaimer
Freedom of Information Act
Approved Boots Listing
Careers External Site Image
iSalute External Site Image

Links
Health.mil External Site Image
Lyster Army Clinic External Site Image
DISA Webmail (CAC) External Site Image
Office of Special Counsel External Site Image
Official Fort Rucker Website External Site Image

Connect with us!
Social Media Icons
 
This Web site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL) and contains official Government information. Its use is intended for members of the general public, news media and Army Medical Department beneficiaries. Please address questions or concerns about this website to the USAARL Public Affairs Office via email or by telephone at 334-255-6883
U.S. Army Website And Logo US Army Medicine Website MRMC Logo & Website